Game Guidelines

1.) Act out your character’s personality as often as possible.

After you set out creating personality flaws and complications for your character, make sure you are mindful of them during role-play and try to approximate your actions to your chosen character traits. So for example, if your character has a rebellious streak, that character should usually take a confrontational stance whenever they encounter a figure of authority. Failure to maintain your character’s personality traits on a regular basis will result in forced character modifications by the GM. For example, if your character is written as ill-tempered and impulsive but winds up being role-played as shy and reserved, you may be forced to change your character to reflect your preferred playing style. In extreme cases, penalties may also include deductions in skill points for repeated neglect or intentional disregard of character flaws, complications and traits. Character neglect is not the same as choosing an action that goes against a character’s better judgment in a situation where a character’s flaw is specifically being recognized (i.e. an ice-based hero running into a burning building to save a person’s life) Strict regulation of role-playing is necessary to keep general story continuity and character development. Just like making Lemuel Gulliver of Gulliver’s Travels act like a flamboyant gambler and womanizer for no apparent reason would damage the integrity of Jonathan Swift’s tale, forcing your character to immediately become something they are not would also hurt the rest of the adventure for all time. The primary responsibility of keeping track of your character belongs to you, the player. Characters will have many opportunities to gradually change their personality through the course of the adventure, should the player wish to do so. Balancing character development in this way is part of the art of good role-playing.

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2.) Good roleplay will always be rewarded

Skill points will be given out to players who make full use of game rules and strategies while adventuring, and who exhibit adequate ability in playing their characters. Some examples of good role-playing: making routine perception checks upon entering unexplored areas, searching for hidden traps, having conversations with NPC’s and asking them questions, acting out a character’s personality in words and actions, and being mindful of quest objectives when making decisions.

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3.) Following GM directions

If a GM calls the party to make a routine check with an unspecified difficulty class, it would be in your best interest to do so. Do not ask the GM why the routine check is necessary; the result of the check rolls will immediately reveal the answer to your query (or not, depending on if the roll is equal to or higher than the hidden DC). If only one or a few characters manage to meet the check successfully, they and only they will be pulled aside by the GM and have the result whispered to them. It is then up to them to inform the rest of the party or not about the information they receive, at their discretion. On rare occasions, the GM may “god-hand” the story along with ‘deus ex machina’ elements, especially if there is a need to speed things up for the adventure. Such events may also incur a cost of one hero point for all players (hero points are given at the start of every session or as a result of special circumstances). It is up to the players to accept the god-hand when offered. Ultimately, the best choices are ones that are meant to keep the game interesting and fun, so act accordingly.

Game Guidelines

Lion and Dragon - Rebel Yell Dr_Magnanimus